Are You Still Having to Look at Log Files?

I was talking to a customer last week about the workflows they use when a customer contacts the support organization for service.

The most common workflow I see is something like this: customer calls the help desk, the agent asks a bunch of questions, and if they can’t resolve the issue then the agent gets a specialist or an engineer involved. They may open a remote access session to connect to the device (IF it’s connected…) If the problem still can’t be resolved, then they dispatch a field service engineer to the customer. While onsite, the engineer either triages and resolves the issue on their own or they talk to their own help desk to help get things sorted out.

This particular customer said “we don’t necessarily do that. If the help desk can’t resolve the issue, then we ask the customer to send us a set of log files for us to analyze.” Then if they can identify an issue through the examination of these files, they dispatch the engineer.

Going through log files is time-consuming and complicated. You have to look at the files sent to you by the customer when there’s an issue and then you have to compare those files with other log files that represent a healthy machine.

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Takeaways from Field Service Medical

Last week I attended this annual event where there were approximately 100 field service executives from medical device companies.  The event was 2 ½ days long and included interactive sessions on everything from remote service to retaining service techs (a bigger issue than you’d think!).

From my perspective, these were the main IoT topics that dominated the event and my thoughts on them:

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